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FAQs

This is a complete listing of all our frequently asked questions, listed by subject:

Adult Substance Abuse Services FAQsTop

Medication-Assisted Treatment

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) helps people living with opioid addiction reclaim their lives. Most people need help to change addictive behavior into non-addictive, healthful patterns. Through its outpatient MAT program, AltaPointe professionals work with individuals who meet the criteria to provide medication-assisted treatment in an outpatient setting. Medication-assisted treatment has been used since the 1960s to help people who are dependent on opioids. A combination of medication assistance and continued support and therapy, to include individual, group and family counseling, helps most patients live free of addiction.

The program offers early morning hours that are conducive to work, family and active lifestyles.

Patients may pay for services through Medicaid or other self-pay, sliding scale methods. During the initial phone assessment, our specialists review payment methods and billing procedures. Most patients may qualify for free services.

For program information, please call (251) 666-2569.
Adult Outpatient Services, West Mobile Office 4211 Government Blvd.

Intensive Outpatient Services for Women

Designed specifically for women, this program meets three times a week and consists primarily of group counseling sessions designed to promote a life free from addiction. Pregnant women always receive priority.

Office Hours:
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. – Monday through Friday

Group Sessions:
8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday

Intensive Outpatient Services (Oasis)

Geared toward the working patients, this program meets four times a week and consists primarily of group counseling sessions designed to promote a life free from addiction. Pregnant women always receive priority.

Office hours:
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. – Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. – Thursday

Group sessions:
5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. – Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. – Thursday

Expanded Intensive Outpatient Treatment for Co-Occurring Disorders

Designed for patients with mental health issues and substance abuse problem, this treatment addresses these entwined issues with an integrated treatment plan developed to effectively treat both disorders concurrently. Pregnant women always receive priority. This program is offered in Mobile.

Office hours:
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. – Monday through Friday

Group sessions:
8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.; 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday

AltaPointe CareersTop

How can I find out what positions are currently available?

You will find a complete listing of open positions by clicking “Apply Online” on this page.

How do I apply for a position at AltaPointe?

Follow the instructions for applying in the “Careers” section of this website. Select the “Online Application” option. Choose from our listing of open positions and click on the Apply Now button.

How does the application process work?

  • You create a profile and attach your resume and then apply to jobs of interest.
  • All applications are reviewed.
  • We will call you for an interview if your qualifications meet our requirements and you are a preferred candidate for the position.
  • You will be contacted by an HR representative if you are selected for an interview or you will receive an email if the position you applied to closes.
  • To be considered for more than one job, you will need to apply to each opportunity individually. Once a position is closed, the application has expired unless you have applied for another position.

If I’m offered a job, what will I be required to do?

  • Submit proof of authorization to hold employment in the United States.
  • Pass a pre-employment physical, including a drug screen, prior to beginning work.
  • Attend a new employee orientation

What does AltaPointe’s benefits package include?

  • Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama Health Insurance
  • Dental Insurance
  • Vision Insurance
  • Cancer Insurance
  • Flexible Spending Account
  • Short-term and Long-term Disability Insurance
  • Cafeteria/Section 125 Plan
  • Life Insurance
  • Personal Time Off and Paid Holidays
  • Principal 403(b) Retirement Plan
  • Licensure Supervision for LPC and LCSW

BayView-Call for an AppointmentTop

What should I expect when I call?

A specialist will conduct an assessment and screening over the phone. Subsequent appointments may be made at the BayView Professional Associates’ office where you receive your care.

If after answering a number of questions it is determined that you, your loved one or friend would benefit from another provider or other community agency, AltaPointe will assist you by making the appropriate referral in the community.

What information will I need to supply?

  • Caller’s Name (and/or name of individual in need of services)
  • Date of Birth
  • Home Address
  • Insurance Information
  • Social Security Number

What questions might I be asked?

  • Have you ever been a patient at AltaPointe?
  • Describe your current signs/symptoms.
  • Are you able to sleep? Is your sleep affected?
  • Have you had an increase or decrease in appetite?
  • Do you believe you are a danger to yourself?
  • Do you believe you are a danger to others?
  • Do you have any risk factors? (Click to view)
    Risk factors may include:
    ­    Hallucinations
    ­    Delusions
    ­    Paranoia
    ­    Family history of substance abuse/mental Illness
    ­    No support system
  • Do you have any involvement with the police or courts?
  • Do you have any medical problems?
  • Are you experiencing any physical or sexual abuse?
  • Do you believe you may have a substance abuse problem?
  • Have you had previous behavioral health counseling or treatment?

What should I bring to my first appointment?

Because we want your experience with AltaPointe to be the best and most beneficial, please complete the Pre-Intake form and bring it with you. You also may be asked to provide or bring the following documents to your appointment:

  • Proof of insurance
  • Proof of residency
  • Medications and medication list
  • Court papers or power of attorney document, if needed
  • Your photo ID (driver’s license, passport, or other government issued ID)
  • Your Insurance Card(s)
  • Your copay and/or deductible amount in full
  • Pre-Intake Form (please complete and bring with you to your first appointment)

Children’s OutpatientTop

What Are the Symptoms of Mental Illness in Children?

Children’s symptoms vary depending on the type of mental illness, but some of the general symptoms include:

  • Changes in school performance, such as poor grades despite good efforts
  • Abuse of drugs and/or alcohol
  • Inability to cope with daily problems and activities
  • Changes in sleeping and/or eating habits
  • Excessive complaints of physical ailments
  • Defying authority, skipping school, stealing, or damaging property
  • Intense fear of gaining weight
  • Long-lasting negative moods, often accompanied by poor appetite and thoughts of death
  • Frequent outbursts of anger
  • Loss of interest in friends and activities they usually enjoy
  • Significant increase in time spent alone
  • Excessive worrying or anxiety
  • Hyperactivity
  • Persistent nightmares or night terrors
  • Persistent disobedience or aggressive behavior
  • Frequent temper tantrums
  • Hearing voices or seeing things that are not there (hallucinations)

Delivery of CareTop

Clinical Model

Our clinical model of care helps individuals living with serious mental illness, emotional disturbance, intellectual disability, and substance abuse issues obtain the treatment and skills they require to succeed.

Staff Training

AltaPointe specially trains all direct-care staff in the prevention and management of aggressive behavior and crisis intervention. Staff members receive training and gain required experience to work with specialized populations.

Credentials

AltaPointe’s clinical staff members meet the appropriate Alabama State Department of Mental Health and other professional certification and licensure requirements. All medical staff members, including physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, possess licensure and/or certification from appropriate state and/or professional agencies.

Treatment Teams

In addition to a psychiatrist and depending on the needs of the individual patient and the services offered by any particular inpatient or outpatient program, treatment teams may include social workers, licensed professional counselors, case managers, educational coordinators, discharge planners, recreational therapists and behavioral staff.

Electronic Medical Records Management

Simply put, EMR is a digital version of a patient’s chart containing all the current and relevant medical, psychiatric and medication history. With our secure EMR system, doctors can access and share treatment data at the click of a mouse. EMR improves the diagnosis, treatment and speed of care delivery. As a leader in healthcare innovation, AltaPointe has embraced the relatively new field of electronic medical records as a vehicle to improve patient care.

MHFA FAQsTop

What is Mental Health First Aid?

Mental Health First Aid is an 8-hour training course designed to give members of the public key skills to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. The evidence behind the program demonstrates that it does build mental health literacy, helping the public identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illness.

How many days does it take to complete the Mental Health First Aid program?

The Mental Health First Aid program runs 8 hours and may be offered in a variety of formats. Most often, it is conducted as a one-day seminar or two half-day sessions.

What do Mental Health First Aid training participants learn?

Just as CPR training helps a layperson with no clinical training assist an individual following a heart attack, Mental Health First Aid training helps a layperson assist someone experiencing a mental health crisis, such as contemplating suicide. In both situations, the goal is to help support an individual until appropriate professional help arrives. Mental Health First Aiders learn a single 5-step strategy that includes assessing risk, respectfully listening to and supporting the individual in crisis, and identifying appropriate professional help and other supports. Participants are also introduced to risk factors and warning signs for mental health or substance use problems, engage in experiential activities that build understanding of the impact of illness on individuals and families; and learn about evidence-supported treatment and self-help strategies.

Where did Mental Health First Aid start?

Mental Health First Aid was created in Australia in 2001 by Professor Tony Jorm, a respected mental health literacy professor, and Betty Kitchener, a nurse specializing in health education. The program is auspiced at the ORYGEN Research Center at the University of Melbourne, Australia. (www.mhfa.com.au)

Who should take a Mental Health First Aid course?

Mental Health First Aid is intended for a variety of audiences, such as:

  • friends and family of individuals with mental illness
  • mental health and social service professional
  • primary care professionals
  • school and college leadership, educators, personnel
  • employers and business leaders
  • faith communities
  • school and college leadership, educators, personnel
  • professionals such as police officers
  • human resource directors
  • nursing home staff members, and
  • members of the public

The training venues will also vary as Mental Health First Aid program sites reach out to Chambers of Commerce, professional associations, hospitals, nursing homes, Rotary Clubs, parent organizations, social clubs and other groups who make up the fabric of a community. The core program is tailored for response to the general adult population.

Is there evidence to support the effectiveness of the program?

Yes, in fact, the strong evidence base is the very reason the National Council selected this particular program. Five published studies in Australia show that the program saves lives, improves the mental health of the individual administering care and the one receiving it, expands knowledge of mental illnesses and their treatments, increases the services provided and reduces overall stigma by improving mental health literacy. One trial of 301 randomized participants found that those who trained in Mental Health First Aid have greater confidence in providing help to others, greater likelihood of advising people to seek professional help, improved concordance with health professionals about treatments, and decreased stigmatizing attitudes. Unexpectedly, the study also found that Mental Health First Aid improved the mental health of the participants themselves. For further evidence supporting the implementation of Mental Health First Aid, please see the Evaluation section of the Australian Mental Health First Aid website: http://www.mhfa.com.au/evaluation.shtml

Have consumers of mental health or addictions services contributed to the development of Mental Health First Aid?

Yes. In fact, one of the original founders of the program in Australia is a consumer. Here in the United States, the National Council continually consults with mental health consumers to ensure the program content accurately reflects consumer experiences and perspectives. Consumers have maintained an active voice in focus groups, aided development of the training manual, and offered invaluable feedback on the program content itself. Additionally, a number of our certified instructors are mental health consumers themselves.

Has Mental Health First Aid been replicated in other countries?

Yes. To date, it has been replicated in Cambodia, Canada, England, Finland, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, and Wales in addition to the United States.

What is different about Youth MHFA?

Youth Mental Health First Aid is a public education program that introduces participants to the unique risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems in adolescents and the importance of early intervention. The ultimate goal is to teaching individuals how to help a youth in crisis. Mental Health First Aid USA worked with experts at the National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health at the Georgetown University for Child and Human Development to develop the training.

How do I find a Mental Health First Aid course near me?

Search our database for up and coming courses near you here.

How can I learn more about Mental Health First Aid?

AltaPointe schedules training sessions daily. To learn how to participate in Mental Health First Aid training in Mobile, call (251) 450-4340.

Most Treated Disorders-AdultsTop

Substance Abuse and Addiction

Addiction is a serious illness. Health, finances, relationships, careers—all can be ruined. The abuse of drugs and alcohol is by far the leading cause of preventable illnesses and premature death in our society. The importance of substance abuse treatment cannot be overstated, and fortunately many effective treatments are available. The road to recovery, however, begins with recognition.

Consequences of use

Alcohol

People often drink alcohol during social occasions; it tends to loosen inhibitions. Unfortunately, the recklessness often resulting from excessive drinking is a leading cause of serious injuries and accidental deaths. In addition, alcohol is the most common cause of preventable birth defects, including fetal alcohol syndrome. Of course, excessive drinking can also lead to alcoholism; an illness that tends to run in families and is often associated with depression. Alcoholism can have devastating effects on health, including serious liver damage, greater risk of heart disease, impotence, infertility, and premature aging.

Marijuana

The most widespread and frequently used illicit drug is marijuana. It is associated with the following consequences:

  • Short-term memory loss
  • Accelerated heartbeat
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Difficulty with concentrating and information processing
  • Lapses in judgment
  • Problems with perception and motor skills

 

In addition, years of marijuana use can lead to a loss of ambition and an inability to carry out long-term plans or to function effectively.

Stimulants

Stimulants (for example, cocaine, “crack,” amphetamines) give a temporary illusion of enhanced power and energy. As the initial elevation of mood fades, however, a depression emerges. Stimulant abuse can lead to serious medical problems.

  • Heart attacks—even in young people with healthy hearts
  • Seizures
  • Strokes
  • Violent, erratic, anxious, or paranoid behavior

 

Cocaine use during pregnancy may result in miscarriages, stillbirths, or low-birth-weight babies who may be physically dependent on the drug and later may develop behavioral or learning difficulties. Excessive crack use can lead to a permanent vegetative, or zombie-like, state. Long-term amphetamine abuse can result in psychotic effects, such as paranoid delusions and hallucinations.

Heroin

Heroin, which can be smoked, eaten, sniffed, or injected, produces an intense—but fleeting—feeling of pleasure. Serious withdrawal symptoms begin, however, after 4 to 6 hours:

  • Chills
  • Sweating
  • Runny nose and eyes
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Muscle pains
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea

 

Heroin use during pregnancy may result in miscarriages, stillbirths, or premature deliveries of babies born physically dependent on the drug. Those who inject heroin are introducing unsterile substances into their bloodstream, which can result in severe damage to the heart, lungs, and brain. In addition, sharing needles is one of the fastest ways to spread diseases; it is currently the leading cause of all new HIV and hepatitis B cases.

Hallucinogens

Hallucinogens are drugs such as LDS (“acid”) or the new “designer” drugs (for example, “ecstasy”) that are taken orally and cause hallucinations and feelings of euphoria. Dangers from LDS include stressful “flashbacks”—re-experiencing the hallucinations despite not having taken the drug again, sometimes even years later. Excessive use of ecstasy, combined with strenuous physical activity, can lead to death from dehydration or an exceptionally high fever.

Inhalants

Inhalants are breathable chemicals—for example, glue, paint thinner, or lighter fluid. They are commonly abused by teenagers because they are easy to obtain and because they produce mind-altering effects when “sniffed” or “huffed.” These chemicals reach the lungs and bloodstream very quickly and can be deadly. High concentrations of inhalant fumes can cause heart failure or suffocation. Long-term abuse of inhalants can cause permanent damage to the nervous system.

Sedatives

Sedatives are highly effective medications prescribed by physicians to relieve anxiety and to promote sleep. Unfortunately, harmful effects can occur when they are taken in excess of the prescribed dose or without a physician’s supervision, such as when they are obtained illegally. Combining sedatives with alcohol or other drugs greatly increases the likelihood of death by overdose. Women who abuse sedatives during pregnancy may deliver babies with birth defects (for example, cleft palate) who may also be physically dependent on the drugs.

Nicotine

The U. S. Surgeon General has confirmed that nicotine in tobacco products has additive properties similar in severity to those of heroin. Quitting is difficult because of the unpleasantness of withdrawal, which involved feelings of irritability, frustration, anger, anxiety, insomnia, and depression. However, continued smoking may lead to far more dire circumstances:

  • Lung cancer
  • Heat attacks
  • Emphysema
  • High blood pressure
  • Ulcers

Treatment

The first step on the road to recovery is recognition of the problem, but often this process is complicated by a lack of understanding about substance abuse and addiction or, worse, denial. In these cases, what often prompts treatment are interventions by concerned friends and family. Many health centers and other institutions offer screenings free of charge for various disorders throughout the year. For example, screening tests for alcohol abuse are usually offered in early April.
Because substance abuse affects many aspects of a person’s life, multiple forms of treatment are often required. For most, a combination of medication and individual or group therapy is most effective. Medications are used to control the drug cravings and relieve the severe symptoms of withdrawal. Therapy can help addicted individuals understand their behavior and motivations, develop higher self-esteem, and cope with stress. Other treatment methods that may be used as part of the rehabilitation process include the following:

  • Hospitalization
  • Therapeutic communities—highly controlled, drug-free environments
  • Outpatient programs, including methadone maintenance for heroin addiction

 

Finally, in addition to treatment, self-help groups for substance-abusing individuals (Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous) as well as their family members (Al-Anon or Nara-Anon Family Groups) are useful in providing support and reinforcing messages learned in treatment. These organizations can be found on the Internet of in your local telephone directory.

 

Patient InformationTop

How do I pay for services?

AltaPointe accepts most major commercial insurance as well as All Kids, Medicaid and Medicare. We also provide services to people who are uninsured, depending on their symptoms and needs. For patients who meet the criteria, financial assistance and/or a reduced fee schedule may be available.

You can call (251) 450-2211 or (888) 335-3044 for information on all of our programs and services.

Billing Questions
The AltaPointe Finance & Accounting Office can assist you with your billing needs. In order to assist you, please click here to complete and submit a form with your questions and information to our business office. If you prefer to speak to someone in our business office, please contact us at (251) 450-5916.

What should I do if I am in a crisis?

If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, call 9-1-1. If you are in a psychiatric crisis situation that is not life-threatening, call AltaPointe at (251) 450-2211 or (888) 335-3044.

What if I need directions to the office?

Patients visiting AltaPointe or one of its hospitals for the first time may need written directions to their appointment destination. We have provided a complete list of offices and hospitals with addresses, written driving directions and a map for the convenience of our patients and their caregivers or family members.

Corporate Offices
Hospitals
Outpatient

Patient Rights – AltaPointe Adult Outpatient, Inpatient & ResidentialTop

When you are a patient at AltaPointe you have the right to:

  • Be treated with respect, dignity and privacy.
  • Be treated in a safe and humane place.
  • Know the facts about your care, which has been designed just for you.
  • Know the facts about your medicine.
  • Be told where to get help if you have pain or other medical problems.
  • Get help from others.
  • Give your written consent for treatment.

Facts about your care. You have the right to be told:

  • What your illness is and what the doctor thinks is the best way to treat it.
  • How long your treatment will last.
  • The cost of your treatment, what part your insurance will pay, and if there are any limits on your treatment.
  • The rules about behavior in the program.

Facts about your medicine. You have the right to:

  • Take medicine only if ordered by a doctor.
  • Be told about your medicine, including information about any side effects that you may expect and how the medicine will help you.
  • Refuse to take any medicine, unless your care and treatment has been ordered by the court.

Making decisions about your care. You have the right to:

Have a treatment plan set up for your needs and to have it reviewed on a regular basis.

  • Help plan your treatment and have your family participate, if you want.
  • Get your treatment in the place that is the least restrictive for you.
  • Refuse any treatment unless it has been ordered by a court.

 

Getting help from others. You have the right to:

Get a second opinion, at your expense.

  • File a complaint and get an answer to your complaint about services or treatment.
  • Talk to an attorney.
  • Have contact with the court system.
  • Talk to a pastor or minister and to worship in the faith of your choice.
  • Access protective services.
  • Pray, if you want to.
  • Get proper, healthy meals.
  • Have your personal belongings and clothing to wear.
  • Have visitors, to send or get mail and phone calls in private.
  • Not be put into isolation or restrained or put on drugs unless this is a part of your treatment.
  • Refuse to do any work that would financially benefit AltaPointe Health.
  • Get a free public education if you are of school age.
  • See a doctor or dentist and get the health care you need (at your own expense).
  • Formulate or have your Advanced Directive honored.

You have duties too. You should:

Respect other people.

  •  Talk to our staff.
  • Not touch other people in the wrong way.
  • Not run away.
  • Not break things.
  • Take your medicine.
  • Follow the rules.
  • Join in activities.
  • Do your chores.
  • Not hurt other people or fight.

Contacts that can assist with questions about your rights

 

If you feel that any of your rights have been violated or if you want further information, you may contact the following:

Alabama Department of Mental Health Advocacy Office
(800) 367-0955

Alabama Department of Human Resources
(251) 450-1800

Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program
(800) 826-1675

AltaPointe Health Consumer Needs Department
(251) 450-4303

You may contact the Joint Commission’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns or register complaints about AltaPointe Health either by calling (800) 994-6610 or e-mailing complaint@jointcommission.org.

You may also call Elder Care at Alabama Department of Public Health in Montgomery/Division of Health Care Facilities to report a complaint and/or to ask questions about your Advance Directive at (800) 356-9596, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Patient Rights – AltaPointe Adult Substance AbuseTop

When you are a patient at AltaPointe you have the right to:

  • Be treated with respect, dignity and privacy.
  • Be treated in a safe and humane place.
  • Know the facts about your care, which has been designed just for you and is responsive to and respectful of your unique characteristics, needs and abilities.
  • Be told where to get help if you have pain or other medical problems.
  • Get help from others.
  • Be informed of all program rules and client responsibilities prior to initiation of care, and the consequences of non-compliance.
  • Provide input into the entity’s service delivery processes through client satisfaction surveys and other avenues provided by the governing body.
  • Receive services that are free of:

– Physical abuse
– Sexual abuse
– Harassment
– Physical punishment
– Psychological abuse, including humiliation
– Threats
– Exploitation
– Coercion
– Financial abuse

  • Report without fear of retribution, any instances of perceived abuse, neglect, or exploitation.
  • Privacy, both inside and outside the program setting.
  • Be informed of any potential restriction of rights that may be imposed.
  • Be informed of the parameters of confidentiality.
  • Be informed of client rights at the time of admission, both verbally and in writing.
  • Be informed of the person who has primary responsibility for your care.

 

Before receiving services provided by AltaPointe, you have the right to:

  • Give your written consent for treatment.
  • Withhold consent for treatment.
  • Be provided a copy of these consents.

Facts about your care. You have the right to:

  • Be told what your illness is and what the doctor thinks is the best way to treat it.
  • Be told how long your treatment will last.
  • Be told the cost of your treatment, what part your insurance will pay and if there are any limits on your treatment.
  • To be informed of the nature of possible significant adverse effects of the recommended treatment, including any appropriate and available alternative treatments, services, and/or providers.

Facts about your medicine. You have the right to:

  • Take medicine only if ordered by a doctor.
  • Be told about your medicine, including information about any side effects you may expect and how the medicine will help you.
  • Be informed of any appropriate and available alternative treatments, services, and/or providers.
  • Refuse to take any medicine, unless your care and treatment has been ordered by the court.

Making decisions about your care. You have the right to:

  • Have a treatment plan set up for your needs and to have it reviewed on a regular basis.
  • Receive services based on your treatment plan and be provided with appropriate information to facilitate decision making regarding treatment.
  • Help plan your treatment and have your family participate if you want.
  • Express your preference of provider.
  • Refuse any treatment unless it has been ordered by a court.
  • The provision of care according to accepted clinical practice standards within the least restrictive and most accommodating environment possible.

Getting help from others. You have the right to:

  • Get a second opinion, at your expense.
  • Talk to an attorney.
  • Have contact with the court system.
  • Access protective services.
  • Pray, if you want to.
  • Not be put into isolation or restrained or put on drugs unless as a part of your treatment.
  • Refuse to do any work that would financially benefit AltaPointe Health.
  • Formulate or have your Advanced Directive honored.
  • The availability of an adequate number of competent, qualified and experienced professional clinical staff to ensure appropriate implementation of the client’s service plan.

You have duties too. You should:

  • Respect other people.
  • Talk to our staff.
  • Not touch other people in the wrong way.
  • Not destroy AltaPointe property.
  • Take your medicine.
  • Follow the rules.
  • Join in activities.
  • Not hurt other people or fight.

Contacts that can assist with questions about your rights

If you feel that any of your rights have been violated or if you want further information, you may contact the following:

Alabama Department of Mental Health Advocacy Office
(800) 367-0955

Alabama Department of Human Resources
(251) 450-1800

Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program
(800) 826-1675

AltaPointe Health Consumer Needs Department
(251) 450-4303

You may contact the Joint Commission’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns or register complaints about AltaPointe Health either by calling (800) 994-6610 or e-mailing complaint@jointcommission.org.

You may also call Elder Care at Alabama Department of Public Health in Montgomery/Division of Health Care Facilities to report a complaint and/or to ask questions about your Advance Directive at (800) 356-9596, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Patient Rights – AltaPointe Children’s Outpatient ServicesTop

When you are a patient at AltaPointe, you have the right to:

  • Be treated with respect.
  • Be treated in a safe place.
  • Know how we will help you.
  • Get help from others, like your priest, pastor, preacher, or rabbi.

Facts about your care. You have the right to:

  • Know why you are here and what the doctor thinks is the best way to help you.
  • Know how long you have to come here.
  • Not to be secluded or restrained unless a doctor says so.

About your medicine. You have the right to:

  • Take medicine only if the doctor says you should.
  • Know about your medicine and how it can make you feel better.
  • Not take the medicine unless a judge says you have to.

Making decisions about your care. You have the right to:

  • See your record.
  • Help plan your treatment.
  • Get your treatment in the place that least restricts you.
  • Not have any treatment unless the judge says you have to.

About your treatment. You have the right to:

  • Be safe from harm while you are here.
  • Have your record kept private unless there is an emergency.

You have duties too. You should:

  • Respect other people.
  • Talk to your staff.
  • Not touch other people in the wrong way.
  • Not run away.
  • Not break things.
  • Take your medicine.
  • Not hurt other people or fight.
  • Go to school.
  • Follow the rules.
  • Join in activities.
  • Do your chores.

Contacts that can assist with questions about your rights

If you feel that any of your rights have been violated or if you want further information, you may contact the following:

Alabama Department of Mental Health Advocacy Office
(800) 367-0955

Alabama Department of Human Resources
(251) 450-1800

Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program
(800) 826-1675

AltaPointe Health Consumer Needs Department
(251) 450-4303

You may contact the Joint Commission’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns or register complaints about AltaPointe Health either by calling (800) 994-6610 or e-mailing complaint@jointcommission.org.

 

Patient Rights – BayPointe Children’s HospitalTop

When you are a patient at BayPointe, you have the right to:

  • Be treated with respect.
  • Be treated in a safe place.
  • Know how we will help you.
  • Get help from others, like your priest, pastor, preacher, or rabbi.

Facts about your care. You have the right to:

  • Know why you are here and what the doctor thinks is the best way to help you.
  • Know how long you have to stay here.
  • Not be secluded or restrained unless a doctor says so.

About your medicine. You have the right to:

  • Take medicine only if the doctor says you should.
  • Know about your medicine and how it can make you feel better.
  • Not take the medicine unless a judge says you have to.

Making decisions about your care. You have the right to:

  • See your record.
  • Help plan your treatment.
  • Get your treatment in the place that least restricts you.
  • Not have any treatment unless the judge says you have to.

About your treatment. You have the right to:

  • Be safe from harm while you are here.
  • Have your record kept private unless there is an emergency.

If you are getting care in a residential setting, you also have the right to:

  • Get healthy meals.
  • Have your own things and your own clothes.
  • Not do any work that otherwise we would have to pay for.
  • Go to public school every day.
  • Pray if you want to. We cannot make you pray.
  • See a doctor or a dentist if you need to.
  • Have visitors, send mail, and make phone calls in private.

You have duties too. You should:

  • Respect other people.
  • Talk to your staff.
  • Not touch other people in the wrong way.
  • Not run away.
  • Not break things.
  • Take your medicine.
  • Not hurt other people or fight.
  • Go to school.
  • Follow the rules.
  • Join in activities.
  • Do your chores.

Remember, your rights cannot be taken away from you without a very good reason.

Contacts that can assist with questions about your rights

If you feel that any of your rights have been violated or if you want further information, you may contact the following:

Alabama Department of Mental Health Advocacy Office
(800) 367-0955

Alabama Department of Human Resources
(251) 450-1800

Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program
(800) 826-1675

AltaPointe Health Consumer Needs Department
(251) 450-4303

You may contact the Joint Commission’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns or register complaints about AltaPointe Health either by calling (800) 994-6610 or e-mailing complaint@jointcommission.org.

 

Patient Rights – BayView Professional AssociatesTop

When you are a patient at AltaPointe you have the right to:

  • Be treated with respect, dignity and privacy.
  • Be treated in a safe and humane place.
  • Know the facts about your care, which has been designed just for you.
  • Know the facts about your medicine.
  • Be told where to get help if you have pain or other medical problems.
  • Get help from others.
  • Give your written consent for treatment.

Facts about your care. You have the right to:

  • Be told what your illness is and what the doctor thinks is the best way to treat it.
  • Be told how long your treatment will last.
  • Be told the cost of your treatment and what part your insurance will pay, and if there are any limits on your treatment.
  • Be told the rules about behavior in the program.

Facts about your medicine. You have the right to:

  • Take medicine only if ordered by a doctor.
  • Be told about your medicine, including information about any side effects you may expect and how the medicine will help you.
  • Refuse to take any medicine, unless your care and treatment has been ordered by the court.

Making decisions about your care. You have the right to:

  • Have a treatment plan set up for your needs and to have it reviewed on a regular basis.
  • Help plan your treatment and have your family participate if you want.
  • Get your treatment in the place that is the least restrictive for you.
  • Refuse any treatment unless it has been ordered by a court.

 

Getting help from others. You have the right to:

  • Get a second opinion, at your expense.
  • File a complaint and get an answer to your complaint about services or treatment.
  • Talk to an attorney.
  • Have contact with the court system.
  • Talk to a pastor or minister and to worship in the faith of your choice.
  • Access protective services.
  • Pray if you want.
  • Get proper, healthy meals.
  • Have your personal belongings and clothing to wear.
  • Have visitors, to send or get mail and phone calls in private.
  • Not be put into isolation or restrained or put on drugs unless as a part of your treatment.
  • Refuse to do any work that would financially benefit AltaPointe Health.
  • Get a free public education if you are of school age.
  • See a doctor or dentist and get the health care you need (at your own expense).
  • Formulate or have your Advanced Directive honored.

You have duties too. You should:

  • Respect other people.
  • Talk to our staff.
  • Not touch other people in the wrong way.
  • Not run away.
  • Not break things.
  • Take your medicine.
  • Follow the rules.
  • Join in activities.
  • Do your chores.
  • Not hurt other people or fight.

Contacts that can assist with questions about your rights

If you feel that any of your rights have been violated or if you want further information, you may contact the following:

Alabama Department of Mental Health Advocacy Office
(800) 367-0955

Alabama Department of Human Resources
(251) 450-1800

Alabama Disabilities Advocacy Program
(800) 826-1675

AltaPointe Health Consumer Needs Department
(251) 450-4303

You may contact the Joint Commission’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns or register complaints about AltaPointe Health either by calling (800) 994-6610 or e-mailing complaint@jointcommission.org.

You may also call Elder Care at Alabama Department of Public Health in Montgomery/Division of Health Care Facilities to report a complaint and/or to ask questions about your Advance Directive at (800) 356-9596, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Privacy PracticesTop

Homeless Management Information System (HMIS)

AL-501 CoC Public Notice

We collect personal information directly from you for reasons that are discussed in our privacy statement. We may be required to collect some personal information by law or by organizations that give us money to operate this program. Other personal information that we collect is important to run our programs, to improve services for homeless and/ or at-risk persons, and to better understand the needs of homeless and/ or at-risk persons. We only collect information that we consider to be appropriate. To read our full Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) privacy notice

The collection and use of all personal information is guided by strict standards of confidentiality. A copy of our Privacy Notice describing out privacy practice is available to all clients upon request.

To read our full Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) privacy notice click here. 

 

Contacts that can assist with discrepancies or complaints

You may submit in writing a request for review of any discrepancy or complaint under HIPAA to any of the following:

Director, Office of Civil Rights

US Department of Health & Human Services
61 Forsyth St., SW – Suite 31370
Atlanta, GA 30323
(404) 562-7858 or (404) 562-7884

Consumer Needs Department

AltaPointe Health
5750-A Southland Drive
Mobile, AL 36693
(251) 450-4303

Changes to our privacy practices

We reserve the right to change the terms of our practices and to make the new provisions effective for all individually identifiable health information (medical records) that we maintain. If we change our information practices, we will have the revised notice available in the therapist’s office as well as have a supply available in the lobby of the facility.

Examples of disclosures for treatment, payment and health operations

We will use your health information for treatment (for example):

Information obtained by a doctor, nurse or other mental health professional will be recorded in your record and used to determine the course of treatment that will work best for you. Any service provided to you will be documented in the record.

We will use your health information for payment (for example):

A bill may be sent to you or a third-party payer. The information on or accompanying the bill may include information that identifies you, as well as your diagnosis.

We will use your health information for regular health operations (for example):

Members of the medical staff, the risk or quality improvement teams may use information in your health record to assess the care and outcomes in your case and others like it.

Other ways we may or may not share your health information:

Business Associates − We provide some services through contracts with business associates. (Example: certain diagnostic tests).

Directory − We do not have a directory that provides any information concerning your treatment here.

Notification − We will not disclose any information to anyone about you without your written consent/authorization.

Communication with Family − Only with your written authorization/consent will we disclose to a family member, another relative, a close friend, or any other person that you identify, health information relevant to that person’s involvement in your care or payment related to your care.

Research − We may disclose information to researchers when their research has been approved by an institutional review board that has reviewed the research proposal and established protocols to ensure the privacy of your information.

Funeral Directors − We may disclose health information to funeral directors consistent with applicable law to enable them to carry out their duties.

Marketing/Continuity of Care − We may contact you to provide appointment reminders or information about treatment alternatives that may be of interest to you.

Fund raising − We will not contact you concerning any fund-raising activities.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) − We may disclose to the FDA health information relative to adverse effects/events with respect to food, drugs, supplements, product or product defects, or postmarking surveillance information to enable product recalls, repairs, or replacements.

Workers Compensation − We may disclose information to the extent authorized by and to the extent necessary to comply with laws relating to workers compensation or other similar programs established by law.
Public Health − We may disclose your health information as required by law.

Correctional institution − If you are an inmate of a correctional institution, we may disclose to the institution health information necessary for your health and the health and safety of other individuals.

Law Enforcement − We may disclose your health information for law enforcement purposes as required by law or in response to a court order.

Health Oversight Agencies & Public Health Authorities − By Federal law, provisions your health information may be released provided that a work force member or business associate believes in good faith that we have engaged in unlawful conduct or have otherwise violated professional or clinical standards and are potentially endangering one or more consumers, workers or the public.

For more information or to report a problem

If you have questions and would like additional information, you may contact the Consumer Needs Specialist at (251) 450-4303.

If you believe your privacy rights have been violated, you can file a complaint with the Consumer Needs Specialist at AltaPointe Health or with the US Secretary of Health & Human Services. There will be no retaliation for filing a complaint.

Your written statement to AltaPointe Health and/or the Office of Civil Rights must include the following:

  • Your name, address, telephone number, and your signature
  • How, why and when you believe you were discriminated against
  • Name and address of institution or agency you believe discriminated against you
  • Any other relevant information

 

Our responsibilities

AltaPointe Health is required to:

  • Maintain the privacy of your health information.
  • Provide you with notice as to our legal duties and privacy practices with respect to information we collect and maintain about you.
  • Abide by the terms of this notice.
  • Notify you if we are unable to agree to a requested restriction.
  • Accommodate reasonable requests you may have to communicate health information by other means or at other locations.
  • Train our personnel concerning privacy and confidentiality; implement a sanction policy to discipline those who breach privacy or confidentiality of our policy.

We reserve the right to change our practices and to make the new provisions effective for all protected health information we maintain. Should our Information practices change; the revised notice will be available through your therapist and in the lobby of the facility.

We will not use or disclose your health information without your authorization, except as described in this notice.

Your health information rights

Although your medical record is the physical property of AltaPointe Health, the information belongs to you. You have the right to:

  • Request in writing a restriction on certain uses and disclosures of your information as provided by 45 CFR 164.522.
  • Request in writing to obtain a paper copy of your health record as provided for in 45 CFR 164.524.
  • Request in writing to amend your health record as provided in 45 CFR 164.526.
  • Obtain a paper copy of the notice of information practices upon request.
  • Request in writing to obtain an accounting of disclosures of your health information as provided in 45 CFR 164.528.
  • Request in writing communication of your health information by alternative (other) means or at other locations.
  • Revoke in writing your authorization to use and disclose health information except to the extent that action has already been taken.

 

Confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse records

The confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse records maintained by this organization is protected by federal law and regulations. Generally, the program may not communicate to a person outside the program that you attend the program or disclose any information identifying you as an alcohol or drug abuser unless one of the following conditions is met:

  • You consent to it in writing.
  • The disclosure is allowed by a court order.
  • The disclosure is made to medical personnel in a medical emergency or to qualified personnel for program evaluation.

Violations of federal laws and regulations by a program are a crime. Suspected violations may be reported to the appropriate authorities in accordance with federal regulations.

Federal laws and regulations do not protect any information about a crime committed by you either at the program or against any person(s) who works for the program or about any threat to commit such a crime.

Federal laws and regulations do not protect any information about suspected child abuse or neglect from being reported under state law to appropriate state or local authorities.

AltaPointe safeguards Protected Health Information

AltaPointe has a legal duty to safeguard your Protected Health Information (PHI). This PHI includes information that can be used to identify you. It is information that we have created or reviewed about your past, present or future health conditions. It contains what healthcare we have provided to you or the payment history on healthcare related accounts. We must provide you with notice about our privacy practices and explain how, when and why we use and disclose your PHI.

We will not use or disclose your PHI without your authorization, except as described in this notice or otherwise required by law. We are legally required to follow the privacy practices that are described in this notice.

Substance Abuse ServicesTop

Medication-Assisted Treatment

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) helps people living with opioid addiction reclaim their lives. Most people need help to change addictive behavior into non-addictive, healthful patterns. Through its outpatient MAT program, AltaPointe professionals work with individuals who meet the criteria to provide medication-assisted treatment in an outpatient setting. Medication-assisted treatment has been used since the 1960s to help people who are dependent on opioids. A combination of medication assistance and continued support and therapy, to include individual, group and family counseling, helps most patients live free of addiction.

The program offers early morning hours that are conducive to work, family and active lifestyles.

Patients may pay for services through Medicaid or other self-pay, sliding scale methods. During the initial phone assessment, our specialists review payment methods and billing procedures. Most patients may qualify for free services.

For program information, please call (251) 666-2569.
Adult Outpatient Services, West Mobile Office 4211 Government Blvd.

Supported Employment FAQsTop

Let us help you find the right employee

We can do so much more than a “help wanted” ad. After learning about your business needs, AltaPointe’s dedicated Supported Employment team will help you find the right candidate, saving you time, and we’ll continue our support after hire, for as long as you would like.

It’s not just about finding an employee. It’s about finding the right employee.

 

The AltaPointe Supported Employment program assists individuals with mental illness find community-integrated competitive  employment with companies throughout our region. Cultivating opportunities with local employers is a key element in the supported employment process. The team works tirelessly with employers to help them understand the benefits of working with our Supported Employment program and encouraging their participation

Jackson Janitorial Services was recognized with the “2016 Employer of the Year” award for their continued support of our program and working with our clients. Jackson is just one of many local businesses utilizing our services.

If you are an employer seeking the best employee match for your business, please contact AltaPointe’s Supported Employment program for assistance.

For more information, contact our Supported Employment team at (251) 450-4301.

 

 

 

 

 

Let us help you with your job search

 

At AltaPointe, we strive to develop different competitive employment opportunities; all while providing the support you need to grow your skills and confidence, make new friends, earn some money and thrive in your job!

Our trained employment specialists will guide you through every step of the employment process helping to eliminate any undue stress. We understand the many challenges you may face from questions  about benefits, pressure from family members, even the lack of transportation.

The Supported Employment team works closely with individuals to:

  • Understand their strengths and weaknesses
  • Help them establish realistic, personal goals
  • Help them address each of their concerns

Working in conjunction with the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services, AltaPointe provides job education and competitive job placement  services for people living with mental illness who desire to work.

I hadn’t worked in a long time, so I was scared about starting a new job. Now that I am working, I feel like I can achieve my other goals.

From our initial meeting, we aim to build a trusting partnership with you. We take time to find out what you are good at and what you like to do. You may need help with your resume’, interview coaching or your needs might be greater; depending on your circumstances, we offer as little or as much assistance as you need or want. We want you to enjoy the benefits of working as soon as possible.

Whether you are a person living with mental illness who is searching for a competitive job, or an AltaPointe staff member working with someone who has expressed an interest in employment, please contact AltaPointe’s Supported Employment program for more information at (251) 450-4301.

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